RSS

Call for Research Papers: Vol 6, No.2, July- December 2017.

Himalayan Journal of Contemporary Research

                        A UGC approved and listed Journal

 

Call for Research Papers for publication in Himalayan Journal of Contemporary Research (HJCR) ISSN 2319-3174 (Printed Journal):

Greetings from the Editor, HJCR, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla takes immense pleasure in inviting original unpublished Research Papers for the Volume 6, Issue 2 of Bi-annual refereed, UGC approved and listed journal, Himalayan Journal of Contemporary Research from academicians, research scholars, policy makers and consultants. The journal proposes to cover quality research papers pertaining to issues of current interest in all spheres of social sciences. Each paper published in the journal will be selected through a rigorous reviewing and screening

Dates to remember:

Issue: July- December, 2017, Volume-6, Issue-2

Deadline to submit full paper: 30 November, 2017.

Notification of accepted papers / reviewed papers: 15 December,2017

Instructions for Contributors

The editor invites original, scholarly articles and research papers within the aim and scope of the journal. Articles , etc that have not been published previously or submitted elsewhere, and that are not under review for another publication in any medium (e.g. printed journal, conference proceedings, electronic or optical medium) should be submitted to the Editor, Himalayan Journal of Contemporary Research. Copyright clearance for materials used in the articles should be obtained by the author(s). It will be assumed that submission of articles to this journal implies that all the foregoing conditions are applicable Organization: The general organization of research paper should be as follows: The nature and scope of the study should be stated first, and then the details of the methods, materials, tools, procedures and/ or equipments used; followed by findings, discussion and conclusion. Appendices may be used to amplify details where appropriate. Scholarly papers should have introduction, main sections and sub-sections and conclusion.

Format:

  • Paper should be typed on a computer and should be print out on standard, white 8.5 x 11-inch paper.
  • Double-space the text of your paper, and use a legible font (e.g. Times New Roman). Whatever font you choose, MLA recommends that the regular and italics type styles contrast enough that they are recognizable one from another. The font size should be 12 pt.
  • Leave only one space after periods or other punctuation marks (unless otherwise instructed by your instructor). • Set the margins of your document to 1 inch on all sides.
  • Indent the first line of paragraphs one half-inch from the left margin. MLA recommends that you use the Tab key as opposed to pushing the Space Bar five times.
  • Create a header that numbers all pages consecutively in the upper right-hand corner, one-half inch from the top and flush with the right margin. (Note: Your instructor may ask that you omit the number on your first page. Always follow your instructor’s guidelines.)
  • Use italics throughout your essay for the titles of longer works and, only when absolutely necessary, providing emphasis.
  • If you have any endnotes, include them on a separate page before your Works Cited page. Entitle the section Notes (centered, unformatted).
  • In the upper left-hand corner of the first page, list your name, your instructor’s name, the course, and the date. Again, be sure to use double-spaced text.
  • Double space again and center the title. Do not underline, italicize, or place your title in quotation marks; write the title in Title Case (standard capitalization), not in all capital letters.
  • Use quotation marks and/or italics when referring to other works in your title, just as you would in your text: Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas as Morality Play; Human Weariness in “After Apple Picking”
  • Double space between the title and the first line of the text.
  • Create a header in the upper right-hand corner that includes your last name, followed by a space with a page number; number all pages consecutively with Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3, 4, etc.), one-half inch from the top and flush with the right margin. (Note: Your instructor or other readers may ask that you omit last name/page number header on your first page. Always follow instructor guidelines.)
  • Manuscripts to be submitted online at hjcr2013june@gmail.com. Refer to steps mentioned below for online submission.
  • Maximum length of the manuscript should be between 3000-5000 words.
  • Main attachment should contain full text contain including title of the manuscript at the top, an abstract of no more than 100 words.
  • Authors names should not appear on anywhere on the body of the manuscript to facilitate the referred and blind review process.

Abstract: The abstract is to be in fully-justified italicized text as it is here, below the author information. Use the word “Abstract” as the title, in 12-point Times New Roman, boldface type, cantered relative to the column, initially capitalized. The abstract is to be in 11-point, single-spaced type, and may be up to 3 in. (18 picas or 7.62 cm) long. Leave two blank lines after the abstract, then begin the main text. All manuscripts must be in English. References: List and number all bibliographical references in 9-point Times New Roman, single-spaced with 10-point interlining spacing, at the end of your paper. When referenced in the text, enclose the citation number in square brackets, for example [1]. Where appropriate, include the name(s) of editors of referenced books. Journal Article Author, A. A., Author, B. B. & Author, C. C. (Year). Title of article. Title of Periodical, volume number (issue number), pages. Example: Harlow, H. F. (1983). Fundamentals for preparing psychology journal articles. Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 55, 893-896. Book Surname, Initials (Year), Book Title, publisher, Place. Example: Berndt, T. J. (2002). Friendship quality and social development. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 11,7-10. Chapter in a Book Author, A. A., and Author, B. B. (Year of publication). Title of chapter. In A. Editor and B. Editor (Eds.), Title of book (pages of chapter). Location: Publisher. Example: O’ Neil, J. M., & Egan, J. (1992). Men’s and women’s gender role journeys: A metaphor for healing, transition, and transformation. In B. R. Wainrib (Ed.), Gender issues across the life cycle (pp. 107-123). New York, NY: Springer. Conference Proceedings Last Name, First Name, ed. Conference Title that Includes Conference Date and Location. City of Publication: Publisher, Date of Publication. Print. Example: Black, L.(1998, February), The Development of sign language in hearing children, Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Professional Linguistics Society, Munich, Germany. Unpublished doctoral dissertation Last Name, F. N. (Year). Title of Dissertation. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Name of Institution, Location. Example: Smith, A. (2001), Analysis of non union American companies in the late 1990s, Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Georgetown University, Washington.

IMPORTANT NOTE:

  1. The contributors are advised to refer to the previous issues of the HJCR for choosing their research topic in order to avoid repetition unless the researcher is looking at research problem from a completely different perspective.
  2. The reviewer’s report after scrutiny of research paper should be taken seriously by the contributor and research paper amended accordingly.
  3. All the references to secondary materials in the research paper must be meticulously cited and included in the Bibliography. This also holds true for all the statistical publications e.g. Census Reports, World Bank Reports, Statistical Reports etc.
  4. All the citations/references in the paper should be in strict accordance with MLA Handbook 7th edition or look up http://www.owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01 for detailed guidelines on submitting a publishable paper.
  5. Contributions that don’t adhere to the above mentioned norms will be summarily rejected by the Editor.
Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 27, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

Call for Research Papers: Vol 6, No.1

Himalayan Journal of Contemporary Research

Call for Research Papers for publication in Himalayan Journal of Contemporary Research (HJCR) ISSN 2319-3174 (Printed Journal):

Greetings from the Editor, HJCR, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla takes immense pleasure in inviting original unpublished Research Papers for the Volume 6, Issue 1 of Bi-annual refereed journal, Himalayan Journal of Contemporary Research from academicians, research scholars, policy makers and consultants. The journal proposes to cover quality research papers pertaining to issues of current interest in all spheres of social sciences. Each paper published in the journal will be selected through a rigorous reviewing and screening

Dates to remember: 

Issue: January- June 2017, Volume-6, Issue-1

Deadline to submit full paper: 30 April 2017.

Notification of accepted papers / reviewed papers: 15 May 2017

Instructions for Contributors

The editor invites original, scholarly articles and research papers within the aim and scope of the journal. Articles , etc that have not been published previously or submitted elsewhere, and that are not under review for another publication in any medium (e.g. printed journal, conference proceedings, electronic or optical medium) should be submitted to the Editor, Himalayan Journal of Contemporary Research. Copyright clearance for materials used in the articles should be obtained by the author(s). It will be assumed that submission of articles to this journal implies that all the foregoing conditions are applicable Organization: The general organization of research paper should be as follows: The nature and scope of the study should be stated first, and then the details of the methods, materials, tools, procedures and/ or equipments used; followed by findings, discussion and conclusion. Appendices may be used to amplify details where appropriate. Scholarly papers should have introduction, main sections and sub-sections and conclusion.

Format:

  • Paper should be typed on a computer and should be print out on standard, white 8.5 x 11-inch paper.
  • Double-space the text of your paper, and use a legible font (e.g. Times New Roman). Whatever font you choose, MLA recommends that the regular and italics type styles contrast enough that they are recognizable one from another. The font size should be 12 pt.
  • Leave only one space after periods or other punctuation marks (unless otherwise instructed by your instructor). • Set the margins of your document to 1 inch on all sides.
  • Indent the first line of paragraphs one half-inch from the left margin. MLA recommends that you use the Tab key as opposed to pushing the Space Bar five times.
  • Create a header that numbers all pages consecutively in the upper right-hand corner, one-half inch from the top and flush with the right margin. (Note: Your instructor may ask that you omit the number on your first page. Always follow your instructor’s guidelines.)
  • Use italics throughout your essay for the titles of longer works and, only when absolutely necessary, providing emphasis.
  • If you have any endnotes, include them on a separate page before your Works Cited page. Entitle the section Notes (centered, unformatted).
  • In the upper left-hand corner of the first page, list your name, your instructor’s name, the course, and the date. Again, be sure to use double-spaced text.
  • Double space again and center the title. Do not underline, italicize, or place your title in quotation marks; write the title in Title Case (standard capitalization), not in all capital letters.
  • Use quotation marks and/or italics when referring to other works in your title, just as you would in your text: Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas as Morality Play; Human Weariness in “After Apple Picking”
  • Double space between the title and the first line of the text.
  • Create a header in the upper right-hand corner that includes your last name, followed by a space with a page number; number all pages consecutively with Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3, 4, etc.), one-half inch from the top and flush with the right margin. (Note: Your instructor or other readers may ask that you omit last name/page number header on your first page. Always follow instructor guidelines.)
  • Manuscripts to be submitted online at hjcr2013june@gmail.com. Refer to steps mentioned below for online submission.
  • Maximum length of the manuscript should be between 3000-5000 words.
  • Main attachment should contain full text contain including title of the manuscript at the top, an abstract of no more than 100 words.
  • Authors names should not appear on anywhere on the body of the manuscript to facilitate the referred and blind review process.

Abstract: The abstract is to be in fully-justified italicized text as it is here, below the author information. Use the word “Abstract” as the title, in 12-point Times New Roman, boldface type, cantered relative to the column, initially capitalized. The abstract is to be in 11-point, single-spaced type, and may be up to 3 in. (18 picas or 7.62 cm) long. Leave two blank lines after the abstract, then begin the main text. All manuscripts must be in English. References: List and number all bibliographical references in 9-point Times New Roman, single-spaced with 10-point interlining spacing, at the end of your paper. When referenced in the text, enclose the citation number in square brackets, for example [1]. Where appropriate, include the name(s) of editors of referenced books. Journal Article Author, A. A., Author, B. B. & Author, C. C. (Year). Title of article. Title of Periodical, volume number (issue number), pages. Example: Harlow, H. F. (1983). Fundamentals for preparing psychology journal articles. Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 55, 893-896. Book Surname, Initials (Year), Book Title, publisher, Place. Example: Berndt, T. J. (2002). Friendship quality and social development. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 11,7-10. Chapter in a Book Author, A. A., and Author, B. B. (Year of publication). Title of chapter. In A. Editor and B. Editor (Eds.), Title of book (pages of chapter). Location: Publisher. Example: O’ Neil, J. M., & Egan, J. (1992). Men’s and women’s gender role journeys: A metaphor for healing, transition, and transformation. In B. R. Wainrib (Ed.), Gender issues across the life cycle (pp. 107-123). New York, NY: Springer. Conference Proceedings Last Name, First Name, ed. Conference Title that Includes Conference Date and Location. City of Publication: Publisher, Date of Publication. Print. Example: Black, L.(1998, February), The Development of sign language in hearing children, Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Professional Linguistics Society, Munich, Germany. Unpublished doctoral dissertation Last Name, F. N. (Year). Title of Dissertation. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Name of Institution, Location. Example: Smith, A. (2001), Analysis of non union American companies in the late 1990s, Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Georgetown University, Washington.

IMPORTANT NOTE:

  1. The contributors are advised to refer to the previous issues of the HJCR for choosing their research topic in order to avoid repetition unless the researcher is looking at research problem from a completely different perspective.
  2. The reviewer’s report after scrutiny of research paper should be taken seriously by the contributor and research paper amended accordingly.
  3. All the references to secondary materials in the research paper must be meticulously cited and included in the Bibliography. This also holds true for all the statistical publications e.g. Census Reports, World Bank Reports, Statistical Reports etc.
  4. All the citations/references in the paper should be in strict accordance with MLA Handbook 7th edition or look up http://www.owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01 for detailed guidelines on submitting a publishable paper.
  5. Contributions that don’t adhere to the above mentioned norms will be summarily rejected by the Editor.

Edit

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 29, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

Abstracts: Vol. 3, No.2, July-December, 2014

121

Towards Understanding rebours: Caste question in the 1990s in Tamil Nadu

R. Azhagarasan

A meaning only reveals its depths once it has encountered and come into contact with another, foreign meaning: they engage in a kind of dialogue…. We raise new questions for a foreign culture, once that it did not raise itself; we seek answers to our own questions in it; and the foreign culture responds to us by revealing to us its new aspects and new semantic depths.

Caste restricted occupation mobility; have reforms compelled employers to be caste blind?

Sudershan Singh

Amit Thorat

The unpredictable and evolving wave of economic liberalism seems to be threatening and simultaneously transforming many traditional norms, not only confined to the cultural and social spaces but invading the sphere of economic as well. This paper examines if and how has this transforming phase of liberal economics affected occupational structures in India that have historically been linked to caste hierarchies. We use the information provided by the NSSO for individual specific occupations, using the NCO coding classification for two time periods, , 1993/94 and 2004/05 and observe changes in patterns of occupations perused by various social groups namely the Dalits, Advasis and the rest.

Role of Caste in Punjab: Myth and Reality

Deepti

The role of caste is different in every region and society. Everywhere in the world, people face discrimination and prejudice like, Blacks in America, Dalits in India etc. And every government put many efforts to change their conditions. Policies implemented for their betterment also got different names like ‘Reservation policy’ in India, ‘Affirmative Action Programme’ in USA and ‘Positive Discrimination’ in UK. In Indian society, caste has different shades and role. In south Indian states, the role of caste is different from north India states. If we study caste status in Punjab, there are unique features related to Dalits and caste system. Here in, one thing is notable that despite the role of caste being different in Punjab, some recent findings related to Dalits in Punjab which tell us different stories and it is interesting to examine the role of caste in Punjab that is it casteless society or caste plays a vital role in Punjab?

A Comparative Study of Higher Education in Punjab and Himachal Pradesh

Ajay Sharma

Vijay Kumar Kaushal

The paper compares status of higher education in Punjab and Himachal Pradesh using secondary data. Macro level parameters used are literacy rate, gross enrollment ratio; share of graduates and above in total state population. Higher Education Institutions are studied on the basis of their type and specialization, ownership, enrollment and levels of study. Number of students, faculty and staff has been analyzed on the basis of gender and category.

Privatization and Claiming a Share of Profits in Hydropower Development: A Study of Kinnaur District

Amrit Zangmo

The study makes an attempt to understand the nature of privatization and problem associated with claiming a share of benefit in hydropower development by the study of Karcham Wangtoo project. Changes in the proprietary status of resources as well as changes in its ecology have clearly undermined the capacity of local people to reproduce themselves. As commercialization of resources continued, many resource dependent communities have had to take alternative resource for survival strategies.

Livelihood of Fisherfolk Community at Dhamara Port in Coastal Odisha

Jayanta Kumar Behera

The present paper focuses on the Socio-Economic conditions, historical aspects, and the changes in the nature of employment, occupational pattern, educational change, political affiliation and customary practices of the fisherfolk community of coastal Odisha.

Accountability at Grassroots by use of Right to Information: Cases from Odisha

Janmejay Sahu

Various studies confirm that mismanagement, illegality and corruption are major hindrances seen in local government institution which is hampering the good governance and people’s welfare to ensure the rights of the people at grassroots. In this context, the introduction of Right to Information Act- 2005 as legal and constitutional tool to access government information has an important role in checking the challenges that hampers grassroots governance and people’s welfare. This RTI law further empowers the people to access government information that will make them known what the government really does that indirectly reminds their responsibility and accountability if they do any wrongs.

Creep and Kaizen: A Study of Socio-Cultural aspects of ‘Gujjar’ Tribe of Himachal Pradesh

Neelam Kumari

The present paper focuses on Muslim Gujjars of Kangra and Chamba districts, their culture, traditions, relation with other community and the effect of new modern changes in their life style .The resultant changes in lifestyle are seen to accompany transformation in self-perception and certain shifts of identity.

Exploring the dynamics of Human Right Standards in Policing: An Overview

Rajneesh Khajuria

The human rights refers to those minimal rights which every individual must have by virtue of his being member of human family and are usually framed as the rights of the individual in relation to the State. In a democratic country, the police is one of the means by which State seeks to meet its obligation to protect some of the fundamental rights like right to life, liberty and security of persons, right to fair trial, equal protection of laws etc. The police have to play a major role in discharging the human rights obligations. This ambiguous position of police is one of the most fundamental dilemmas for human rights.

A Study of Job Satisfaction among Public and Private Hospitals in Select Districts of Punjab

Akshay Rana Kuldeep Attri

This study investigates the level of job satisfaction among employees working in public and private hospitals in Punjab. For this purpose, data from a total of 440 participants were used, out of which 228 respondents were working in the public hospitals and 212 were in the private hospitals in Punjab. The Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS) was used as an instrument to measure the level of job satisfaction. The Chi-square analysis indicated significant difference in job satisfaction level of employees working in the public and private sector hospitals.

Tracing the Cinematic City of Delhi with special reference to Rakesh Om prakash Mehra’s Rang De Basanti

Gaurav Sood

Delhi’s recent rise as a new superpower of Hindi films can also be attributed to the disloyalty towards singular language, culture and identity. As a historical city of migrants, Delhi is apparently the newest, loudest and invariably a land of opportunities. The new fascination of Hindi cinema with Delhi and the recent shift of the focus to this multilingual, multicultural, bourgeoning megalopolis of Delhi have brought out new methodologies of film making and new ways of storytelling. The most significant reasons for the migration of Hindi cinema are the connection of many film directors, producers and screenwriters with the city.

Roots of Humanistic Vision in Karl Marx’s Writings

Bharti Sharma

This paper explores the humanistic approach of Karl Marx in his later writings especially the theory of alienation in the third volume of Capital which is characterized purely as an economic account and written by Marx in his later age. This theory establishes the fact that Marx has paid a lot of attention to human emancipation throughout his life. His concern for the survival of humanness in an individual and in the society as a whole is deeply embedded in his all works; it has remained a common prior objective in the whole body of Marxian literature.

The Idea of ‘Indo-Pacific’: Actors, Interests and Alignments

Gurinder Kaur

This paper, with the help of discourse analysis tries to describe the notion of ‘Indo-Pacific’ and how the various countries uses the phrase of ‘Indo-Pacific’ and define their policy towards the region and want to make alignments for the fulfillment of their interests.

Role of Developing Countries in Global Environmental Negotiations: A Case Study of India and China

Sachna

Climate change is the biggest development challenge for the countries of the world but the developing countries will be hit hard by the adverse affects of it as has been proved by various reports of IPCC. Their high vulnerability and low capacity to deal with this crisis have kept them united for a long period now but the rise of India and China can change this equation as both want to assert their leadership and both want to grab as many energy resources as they can to develop their economies.

Taking Ethics and Social Responsibility to get Demographic Dividend: Inspired Solutions by a University Teacher

Ritu Bakshi

The paper suggests some solutions to the educators to take up the issue of Ethics and Social Responsibility as a part of hidden curriculum and some of the principles of ethical training have been discussed.

Thinking Styles in Relation to Creativity and Gender

Monika Sood

This paper studies the relationship of thinking styles to creativity and gender. The sample of study consisted of 503 subjects studying in various teacher training institutions in Himachal Pradesh. Hindi Short version of Sternberg and Wagner’s (1992) ‘Thinking Style Inventory’ by Prof. B.P. Verma and Baquer Mehdi’s “Verbal Test of Creative Thinking” (Hindi) were used for data collection. Analysis of data was done within framework of 3X2 factorial designs.

Worship of Goddess Tara Rituals and Possessions with special reference to the Tara Devi Temple of Simla in Himachal Pradesh

Seema Parihar

The present paper deals with the origin and evolution of the goddess ‘Tara’ of Shimla and performance of the rituals with the several types of special offerings and the rites that are most commonly observed in the temple. The study also deals with some rites which have become the source of income to the temple.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 8, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

Tags:

HJCR VOl 3. No. 1

HJCR VOl 3. No. 1

Caste Conflict, Hunger, Violence and the Quest for Identity: A Study of Limbale’s Autobiographical Narrative Akkarmashi

Amit Rauth

Abstract

Indian society in some way or the other entails a cultural hierarchy. At a deeper level there seems to be the gap that impinges on the deprived section i.e. the Dalits by the privileged one i.e. the upper castes. The phenomenon of caste as a status marker has probably been the feature of Indian hegemonic society that has been carried along from time immemorial. One’s caste continues to stick to one’s identity throughout one’s life which as a result creates a continuous fragmentation and hierarchic stratification within the society. This hierarchy resonates and in the process furthers the Dalits from the upper-castes in terms of socio-political and economic stability, deprivation, sufferings and violence which have been the feature of Indian society from ages.  In keeping with the above sentiments this paper closely examines Sharan Kumar Limbale’s Akkarmashi which very aptly reflects the pitiable and tormenting life of the Dalits and especially that of a half-caste who belongs to no one and nowhere.

 

Keywords: Dalit, poverty, violence, caste, identity.

  Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 1, 2014 in Abstracts

 

Tags:

HJCR Vol. 2 No. 1

HJCR Vol. 2 No. 1

WP_20140707_008Cognitive Styles and Distance Learners: A Study of B. Ed. and M. Ed. Students Enrolled in ICDEOL and Regional Centre of Himachal Pradesh University

Ajay Kumar Attri

Neelam Kumari

Abstract

Distance education is a new and vital force in higher education. The design and application of distance learning is of central concern to many educators. Research has been conducted from a variety of perspectives in this area. However in India, there is not much research on cognitive styles especially of distance learners. The present study was undertaken to find out the significant differences in five cognitive styles of male and female distance learners. It was hypothesized that there exists no significant difference in cognitive styles of distance learners. For verification of the hypothesis, data was collected from 333 B.Ed. & M.Ed. distance learners of ICDEOL, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla. (207 (62.16%) were female & 126 (37.84%) were males), which mirrored the gender composition of all the distance learners enrolled for B.Ed. and M.Ed. 1st  and 2nd years for session 2011-12 & 2012-13. Cognitive Style Inventory (CSI) developed by Parveen Kumar Jha was used to study the cognitive styles of male and female distance learners. The statistical technique used was t- test. The findings of the present study revealed that there exist significant gender differences in systematic, intuitive, integrated, undifferentiated and split-style of distance learners. Female distance learners were higher on systematic, intuitive and integrated cognitive style as compare to their counterparts whereas male distance learners were higher on undifferentiated and split-style as compare to female distance learners. Further, it was observed that percentage and age-group range of male and female distance learners on different cognitive styles varied. From these discussions on cognitive styles and study findings, several recommendations can be made to improve current practices in instructional development and delivery for distance learning.

Key words: cognitive styles, distance learners, systematic, intuitive, integrated, undifferentiated and split-style.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 1, 2013 in Abstracts

 

Tags:

HJCR Vol 1. No. 2

HJCR Vol 1. No. 2

WP_20140707_001 (1)

English a Second Language or a Foreign Language with special reference to Multilingualismin Himachal Pradesh

Anil Kumar Swadeshi

Abstract

The paper attempts to analyze the use of English language in Himachal Pradesh so as to reach the conclusion whether English is a second language or a foreign language here. English language appears to be a second language from surface but when we see it from within it is more like a foreign language. The author has theoretically analyzed the social setup of Himachal Pradesh, the scenario of the use of languages in the schools. There is a dire need to correlate English language to the various native regional languages of Himachal Pradesh that will help in growth and development of the system of school education in Himachal Pradesh.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 1, 2012 in Abstracts

 

Tags:

HJCR Vol 1. No. 1

HJCR Vol 1. No. 1

Hjcr____00_jpg (1)

Big- Five Correlates Of Happiness in High School Teachers

 

Anita Sharma, Assistant  Professor, Department of Psychology Himachal Pradesh University Sumer Hill, Shimla

 

Abstract

The current study examined the association between personality dimensions (neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness) and happiness. A sample of 200 teachers drawn randomly from different government and private high schools from the Solan district of Himachal Pradesh with an equal number of males and females completed the Big-five Inventory ((NEO-FFI) (Costa & McCrae, 1991) and the Chinese Happiness Inventory (Lu & Shih, 1997). The findings through regression analyses revealed that the personality variables of neuroticism, extraversion and conscientiousness emerged as the most important and significant predictors of happiness, where, neuroticism contributed 21% to 61% of variance; extraversion contributed 5% to 46% of variance and conscientiousness explained 2% to 3% of variance in private and government school teachers in both the genders. The results further revealed that NEOAC has contributed 68% of total variance in Males sample, 71% of variance in Females’ sample, 70% of variance in Private school sample and 69% of variance in Government school sample.

 

     Keywords: Happiness, Big-five personality and Teachers.

 

Empowering Women through Micro Finance and Self Help Groups

Anupama Singh, Associate Professor ICDEOL, H.P. University Shimla.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 30, 2012 in Abstracts

 

Tags: